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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1067

Title: Lobbying and political marketing: a neglected perspective and research agenda
Authors: Harris, Phil
McGrath, Conor
Keywords: Lobbying
Political marketing
Persuasive communication
Networks
Thematic Category: Public Relations
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: University of Manchester. Business School
Conference: 5th International Political Marketing Conference, Manchester, UK, 27-29 March 2008
Abstract: This paper proposes that lobbying and political marketing have much to learn from each other. Both are essentially persuasive forms of communication; both have some basis in more general marketing theory; both involve exchanges, networks and relationships. However, while much lobbying practice is underpinned or informed by (political) marketing theories, this connection is only rarely made explicit in the literature of either field. Most political marketing writing relates marketing solely to the arena of party political electoral competition, ignoring how it could be further developed into the area of interest groups generally – and, more specifically, into an examination of how organizations attempt to influence public policy. This paper looks briefly at lobbying activities such as grass roots lobbying and lobbying coalitions, and suggests how political marketing can extend its research focus to a wider range of lobbying practices.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1067
URL : http://www.polmark.org/
Pages: 20
Appears in Collections:PR-Conference Proceedings

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